Monica Allon initiated a Polaroid project for the Lower School Extended Day Program at the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts. The artists are students ages 10-15.  "I would bring in very tangible and functional objects from the past for our students to examine, including a typewriter, a record player, a rotary phone and a Polaroid camera. The students gravitated toward the camera because of its shape, which fit perfectly into their hands, the buttons to push and the sounds produced as a picture is taken and the film print comes out of the camera," Monica Allon stated. The students were aware that they were creating instant objects of art which became more apparent when the tactile diagrams were created from their pictures. Using Polaroid film cameras over the course of a year, this group of students, with the aid of Teaching Assistants, learned about and documented their environment. In viewing this collection of photographs, one will appreciate a different perspective of objects and structures, causing each of us to take another look at what we see.  

 A selection of original Polaroid snapshots will be exhibited along with tactile diagram enlargements. Each Polaroid snapshot has been enlarged and, with the use of technology, tactile diagrams were created.  The method used to produce the tactile diagrams of the Polaroids is through Microcapsule or Thermal Imaging. The images were edited with the use of graphic image software. Betsey Sennott, at Perkins School for the Blind, oversees this technology. Large print and braille identify each piece of artwork